by John | Dec 23, 2014 |

Fishing on the Suffolk Coast

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Between Pakefield and Orford Ness, fishing enthusiasts will find the deepest stretches of the East Anglia coast: steep beaches with heavy tide flows and some of the best fishing in the area. Why not give it a try during your stay on the Suffolk Coast?


From the great shingle spit at  Orford Ness, the largest in Europe, and one of the most famous fishing spots on the East Anglian coast, large cod can be caught, as well as bass, rays, dog fish, sole and whiting. The very steep shingle beach is within easy casting distance of deep water.

Northwards, Aldeburgh is a great spot for bass, flounders, sole, dabs, cod, whiting and eels; just head southwards from the town until you reach a series of groynes reaching out to sea.

Continuing up the coast, the stretch of shoreline from Dunwich to Walberswick offers some fantastic fishing, with a variety of species, including big summer bass (if you’re lucky!). Dunwich itself offers the angler some excellent cod fishing - top bait for the area is lugworm.

Did you know? In April 1973, Finnigham angler, Derrick Dorling, landed the biggest shore-caught turbot of all time at Dunwich beach, at 28½lbs!


From Blythburgh, where the river opens into a wide estuary, there is excellent mullet fishing throughout the tidal reaches, with eels, flounders and bass.

For good cod and whiting, head to Southwold beach in winter; the summer months bring bass and some sole, a hotspot for which is usually the groynes to the north of the old pier.

Pakefield beach’s sloping shingle and fair depth of water make it a good spot for fishing, mostly in the winter, when there is excellent fishing for cod, whiting and dabs.



Timing

The best fishing for most species occurs from spring through until the autumn, although the Suffolk coast is a good spot all year round.

April and May see the start of the plaice and sole fishing, with bass and mackerel increasing in numbers from May onwards until November.


Generally, the best time to fish is during the three hours before and three hours after high water. During this six hour window, most feeding goes on as fish are actively searching for prey. At low water the fish are less active and move a little further out to sea.


Tide timetables are available from the BBC weather website.


Click here to learn more about the history of fishing on the Suffolk Coast


Images from Go Fishing


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